Court user experience can be heavy sometimes due to the entangled nature of court use cases and structures. This past week, our course participants took that challenge and conducted research in the field with court employees, and end users. When they were preparing to present their findings, we asked them to think them as highlight reels of a motion picture.

The discussion during the presentations was rich, teams realized the interconnectedness of their design briefs, and why they should be collaborating more in the upcoming weeks. Teams did an excellent job highlighting the detailed issues in their selected scopes. Moreover, they identified some overarching challenges such as courts’ fairness principle, technology bottlenecks regarding vendors, and the importance of feedback loops. What also fascinated me was the medium of some of the presentations. Using enactment and blueprinting/mapping were two creative reporting methods that helped the audience to visualize the insights and the context. 

I would like to share two of these creative reels ~research reportings from the session. 

First one was from the team who picked the prior-to court design brief. Team decided to present their early research findings through enactment. They enacted three different personas, including all-in techie, all-offline persona, and a tech-friendly but busy persona. Choosing enactment as reporting research helped us the audience to grasp the personas and their daily lives more clearly. 

The team who picked the inside the court experience presented their findings using a blueprint of the building on the whiteboard. Each member then presented their experience when they tried to use the service ( walk-in-the mile method) and referred to the blueprint when they were presenting their findings. Again, the medium of presentation made the research more lively than a dry powerpoint presentation. 

 

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